Breast cancer is a group of abnormal cells growing in an uncontrolled way, starting in the breast tissue. These cells are called a tumor. Over time these cells can invade other parts of the body, interrupting normal body function, and can lead to death. Nearly all cases of breast cancer occur in women, although men can get the disease as well. Statistics indicate that tumors diagnosed in younger women may be more aggressive and less responsive to treatment, making early detection key.

 
 

STATISTICS

 
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ACCORDING TO AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY:

More than 3.5 million US women with a history of breast cancer were alive on January 1, 2016.

About 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in their lifetime.

Among women under age 50, incidence rates have slowly increased (0.2% per year) since the mid-1990s.

From 2006 through 2015, breast cancer death rates declined annually by 2.6%


ACCORDING TO THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE:

In the United States, breast cancer is the second most common form of cancer in women after skin cancer.

In 2018, it is estimated that there will be 266,120 new cases of female breast cancer.

Female breast cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

Approximately 12,000 women age 40 or younger are diagnosed with breast cancer every year.

When breast cancer is detected early, in the localized stage, the 5-year survival rate is 98%


ACCORDING TO THE U.S. CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION (CDC):

White women have the highest incidence rate for breast cancer (about 125 women out of every 100,000), followed Black women, then Hispanic women, then Asian/Pacific Islander women, and then American Indian/Alaska Native women.

Death rates from breast cancer tell a different story. Black women have the highest death rates, followed by white women, then hispanic women, then American Indian/Alaska Native women, and then Asian/Pacific Islander women.

ACCORDING TO THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women in the world.

ACCORDING TO JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICAL CENTER

40% of diagnosed breast cancers are detected by women who feel a lump.

 

STAGES

 

We strongly believe that Early detection can save your life but what if you do get diagnosed? Understanding the stages of breast cancer can determine the best way to eliminate it. See below and learn more from the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

STAGE 0
Stage 0 describes non-invasive breast cancers. There is no evidence of cancer cells invading tissue.

STAGE I
Stage I describes invasive breast cancer in which the tumor measures up to 2 centimeters. No lymph nodes are involved at this stage.

STAGE II
Stage II is divided into subcategories known as IIA and IIB.

STAGE IIA
Stage IIA describes invasive breast cancer in which: No tumor can be found in the breast, but cancer cells are found in the lymph nodes. The tumor measures 2 centimeters or less and has spread to the lymph nodes. The tumor is from 2 centimeters to 5 centimeters and has not spread to the lymph nodes.

STAGE IIB
Stage IIB describes invasive breast cancer in which: The tumor is from 2 centimeters to 5 centimeters and has spread to the lymph nodes. The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters but has not spread to the lymph nodes.

STAGE III
Stage III: Stage III is divided into subcategories known as IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

STAGE IIIA
Stage IIIA describes invasive breast cancer in which: No tumor is found in the breast. Cancer is found in lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone. The tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller and has spread to lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures. The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures.

STAGE IIIB
Stage IIIB describes invasive breast cancer in which: The tumor may be any size and has spread to the chest wall and/or skin of the breast. The tumor may have spread to lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone.

STAGE IIIC
Stage IIIC describes invasive breast cancer in which: There may be no sign of cancer in the breast or, if there is a tumor, it may be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast. The cancer has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone.The cancer may have spread to lymph nodes or to lymph nodes near the breastbone.

STAGE IV
Stage IV: Stage IV describes invasive breast cancer in which the cancer has spread to other organs of — usually the lungs, liver, bone, or brain.

 

EARLY DETECTION

 
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MIRROR MIRROR

Look in the mirror and see what you've got going on. Put your hands over your head and then on your hips. boob and side boob are created equal, so be sure to include both.

MINI MASSAGE

Next, keep looking in the mirror and put one hand behind your head. Now place three fingers to your breast and check for anything that strikes you as weird or not your "normal."

UP AND DOWN

Move your three fingers in small circles with different levels of pressure. Choose easy, medium and then hard while walking your fingers to the next area, instead of lifting them off your boobies.

YOUR PITS

Cover your entire breast up and down and into the armpit area, finishing inside your armpit. Leave no breast area unchecked! Side boobs are boobies too. Spend extra time in your pits where your lymphatic system lives and where many breast cancers develop - they may need extra circle massage love